Hollywood actor Donald Glover a.k.a. Childish Gambino has some unexpected heat on his head. Speculation has developed about the hip-hop star possibly stealing his woke af “This Is America” song from another musician.

This week, the Internet noticed major undeniable common factors between Gambino’s hit record and New York hip-hop artist Jase Harley’s previously released “American Pharaoh.”

The allegations arose on Instagram and Reddit as listeners pointed out similarities between “This is America” and “American Pharaoh” by New York rapper Jase Harley. In response to a tweet from user Ahmed/Toronto Akademiks/Every White Blogger, Glover’s creative partner, Fam Rothstein (a co-producer of the “This is America” video and co-principal in the Wolf + Rothstein creative agency alongside Glover and Wolf Taylor), issued a denial. (Consequence of Sound)

[Childish Gambino: 5 Things You (Probably) Didn’t Catch In "This Is America” Video]

A few hours ago, Harley went to Instagram to take credit for inspiring Gambino and said he didn’t have any smoke for him.

RELATED STORIES FROM SOHH.COM

The up-and-coming hip-hop artist has also reportedly shared positive feedback with fans asking him about Gambino possibly jacking his work.

While Childish Gambino, AKA Donald Glover, has yet to address the allegations, New Jersey- based Jase said he noticed the similarities as soon as he heard This Is America and wished that Childish Gambino had given him the credit he deserved. ‘Yeaaa lol it’s cool tho.. glad they liked my song. It’s all love,’ he told fans in a series of Instagram comments as the controversy boiled over on social media. ‘A shout out would be cool. All good tho… he’s a great artist, dope I could’ve had some influence on the record. (Metro)

Back in May, Donald Glover kept his lips sealed about detailing the motivation behind creating “This Is America.”

E! caught up with Glover on the red carpet of the 2018 Met Gala and asked the artist behind Childish Gambino what his intentions were when writing “This Is America” and filming its instant-classic music video. Glover responded with self-aware and politically-charged misdirection: “I just wanted to make, you know, a good song. Something people could play on Fourth of July.” (Indie Wire)