Pusha T On Bush Singling Out Kanye West, “I Don’t Give A F*ck About What His Lowest Point Was”

Pusha T On Bush Singling Out Kanye West, “I Don’t Give A F*ck About What His Lowest Point Was”

After the overwhelming support Kanye West has received after ex-President George W. Bush cited him for creating one of the lowest points in his career, SOHH hit up G.O.O.D. Music’s Pusha T for his opinion of the situation.

While voicing support for his boss, Pusha said Bush should have pondered why so many Americans concurred with West’s 2005 Hurricane Katrina remarks.

“Me, I’m Pusha, I don’t give a f*ck about what George W. Bush’s lowest point was, ever. I don’t care what he thinks,” Pusha told SOHH. “And if Ye was his lowest point, then that says a lot about him. The president of the United States of America, I don’t care how he feels emotionally. Listen man, people be getting it f*cked up, man, a lot of what’s said comes from a very honest place and at the end of the day, if anything Ye said made Bush feel some type of way, then you sort of have to look at stuff in its whole perspective. You have to look in the mirror and say, ‘What the f*ck was I doing wrong to make this guy say this and so many people agree with it?'” (SOHH)

This week, Jay-Z also backed up Ye and questioned Bush’s “lowest point” admission.

Bush’s admission that West’s Hurricane Katrina rant was the low point of his presidency struck Jay-Z as odd. “First, I find it strange, like everyone else should, that one of his lowest points was somebody talking about him,” Jay-Z said of Kanye’s infamous “George Bush doesn’t care about black people” comment. “He’s the president. People should insult him a lot. That’s part of the job description.” He went on to reiterate an excerpt from “Decoded” in which he talks about how the mishandling of the rescue/relief efforts after Hurricane Katrina affected him. “It didn’t feel like a natural disaster; it felt like it was happening directly to blacks, and immediately those images of people in suits getting beaten, sprayed with hoses, beaten on the bridge at Selma, all these emotions were going on inside of us,” Jay said. “Kanye really spoke what everyone else felt.” (MTV)

Last week, Bush said he believed West slandered his image following New Orleans’ disaster.

“He called me a racist,” Bush tells reporter Matt Lauer. “And I didn’t appreciate it then. I don’t appreciate it now. It’s one thing to say, ‘I don’t appreciate the way he’s handled his business.’ It’s another thing to say, ‘This man’s a racist.’ I resent it, it’s not true.” (“Matt Lauer Reports”)

Following Bush’s remarks, West addressed the ex-president and sympathized with him.

“Well I can definitely understand the way he feels to be accused of being a racist in any way because the same thing happened to me [with Taylor Swift], you know, where I got accused of being racist, and with both situations it was basically a lack of compassion that America saw,” he said in an interview. “With him it was a lack of compassion not rushing, you know, taking his time to rush down to New Orleans. With me, it was a lack of compassion in cutting someone off in their moment, but none the less I feel we’re all quick to pull the race card [in America]. And now I’m more open, and the poetic justice that I feel to go through the same thing that he went [through], and now I really more connect with him on a humanitarian level … the next morning when he felt that, I felt the same thing.” (XXL Mag)

Check out Kanye West speaking on George W. Bush below:



sdotsamuel
Also On The Web