News: Kanye West On Kendrick Lamar's 'Control' Targets: "I Don't Do Diss Records" [Video]

Friday, Sep 27, 2013 2:25PM

Written by Cyrus Langhorne

Grammy-winning rapper Kanye West is not going to let himself fall victim to getting upset over being name-dropped by Kendrick Lamar recently and has dismissed the situation.

While quick to the point about Lamar's "Control" jab, Ye focused his attention of preparing to tour with him.

"Yeah, I don't do diss records," Ye replied when asked how he would have reacted to Lamar's verse ten years ago. [The upcoming tour with Kendrick?] Yeah, it's one hundred percent, it's one hundred percent. I'm just looking forward to the opportunity to speak to this brother as much as possible. That, those conversations are going to be more than I even said right here. Because he's one of our future messengers. You know? And I'm going to give him those jewels." (BBC Radio 1)

A few days ago, Young Money's Drake spent a few moments on the buzz Kendrick ignited over the track.

"That ['Control'] verse was a moment to talk about. Are you listening to it now, though?," he asked, hushing all 850 attendees at NYU's Skirball Center, including Wilson. Drake continued: "He didn't come in there on some wild, 'I'm in New York, fuck everybody.' I almost wish he had come in there on that shit because I kind of lost a little bit of respect for the sentiment of the verse," Drake said. "If it's really 'fuck everybody' then it needs to be 'fuck everybody'. It can't just be halfway." (Miss Info TV)

Last month, New York rapper A$AP Rocky gave his take on K. Dot's lyrics in reference to a "King of New York" line.

"He named a lot of n*ggas," A$AP said in an interview. "I feel like, I mean, that 'King of New York' sh*t, you smoking crack, you're crazy, you know what I mean? Honestly though, K. Dot and them n*ggas, that's fam. I think hip-hop needs this sh*t. It's n*ggas who's pissed off just because they wasn't mentioned. ... I'm not justifiying sh*t, rap is rap, my n*gga. N*gga didn't say nothing about nobody mother -- he didn't say he want problems. He said, 'These are my n*ggas and I'm letting y'all know it's competition.' What's the problem? That man know I'm where he at. I feel like all the rappers making disses and responses -- I'ma keep it a buck, it's not even about being relevant because hip-hop ain't about relevance, man. It's all about the sport, it's all about the culture." (Hot 97)

When Kendrick finally came forward to address the track, he denied wanting to spark a West Coast versus East Coast rivalry from the "Control" bars.

"I feel as though there are certain cats that are going to take it to the next level and make it a rivalry thing. That's old school homie. Nobody's trying to do that. We're black men out here trying to uplift the culture. My first sold-out show was in New York. I always looked at that place as a place that respected my lyrics and respected the culture and the birthplace of it. I think the ones that really took it out of context was the people we know want to grab an opportunity just off the fact of the hype of the record, rapping -- a lot of people think it's about talent. That's where they get it wrong, I'm saying I'm the most hungry. I respect the legends of the game. I respect people that have done it before me, people that lost their lives over this. Because of what they laid down, I'm going to try to go that much harder and embrace it and live it. That's the point of the whole verse and what I was trying to convey behind that verse. All the ignorance behind it, kill that noise. It'll never be like that again, with two coasts rivals. Not on my behalf." (Hot 97)

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