News: Nicki Minaj Addresses Controversial Grammy Performance [Audio]

Tuesday, Feb 14, 2012 8:20PM

Written by Cyrus Langhorne

Young Money star Nicki Minaj has stepped forward to speak on the hype behind her controversial Grammy Awards performance Sunday (February 12) night and the motivation to go with religious attire.

Admitting there was no ill will behind the performance, Nicki said her "Roman Holiday" showcase was more along the lines of story-telling.

"I had this vision for him to be sort of exorcised--or actually he never gets exorcised--but people around him tell him he's not good enough because he's not normal, he's not blending in with the average Joe. And so his mother is scared and the people around him are afraid because they've never seen anything like him. He wanted to show that not only is he amazing and he's sure of himself and confident, but he's never gonna change, he's never gonna be exorcised. Even when they throw the holy water on him, he still rises above." (Ryan Seacrest)

Nicki stayed in character by unleashing her "Roman Zolanski" alter ego during the Grammy Awards set.

Nicki Minaj's Grammy performance Sunday night (February 12) was spirited, to say the least. Beginning her set with the "Exorcism of Roman" mini-movie, Minaj unleashed her alter ego onstage in a horror-themed backdrop and debuted her "Roman Holiday" single. It was the most elaborate of the night's Grammy performances and has everyone talking. Nicki's fanatic following on Twitter was in full support of Minaj's display. "@NICKIMINAJ that is a monumental M4L for you and us. I'm in love with your performance," @SlickerGuy tweeted. Others weren't as turned on by the Harajuku Barbie's set. "Lady Gaga and Nicki Minaj, I'm all about expression, but it has gone overboard. Love Adele cause her focus is on music, not controversy," @thekatiestevens wrote. "I liked Nicki Minaj's performance. Too many people be sipping on that hater aid! Hahaha," @_lookslikeali wrote, responding to all the negative comments. (MTV)

Following her performance, speculation on what angry Catholic responses would be the end result developed.

Those who tuned in for Nicki Minaj's Grammy performance experienced a wave of emotion: First they were confused, then amused and then just plain angry. There was fire and a man dressed like the pope. Minaj levitated. Then, an exorcism. Viewers stared at their TVs, slack-jawed and unsure of what exactly they were watching. The religious response to Minaj's performance will surely be furious -- the Catholic League is likely firing up its angriest press release yet -- but fans' reactions were fast and frank. They had no idea what sort of spectacle they had just witnessed, but few of them liked it. (Washington Post)

Her controversial set also prompted Philadelphia pastor Jomo K. Johnson to hit up SOHH with his stance.

"Nick Minaj [has channeled] alter ego spirit - [and mocked] the church of Jesus Christ," Jomo wrote in a statement to SOHH. "The popular rapper has chosen to follow the same blasphemous path as her mentor with [a] disturbing Grammy performance. There exists a certain danger when rap artists begin to cross the invisible line of spiritual blasphemy against the Lord Jesus Christ and the Church. ... I fear to be in Nicki Minaj's or [alter ego] Roman's shoes for that matter. Seeing the past happenings for artists who have crossed that line, repentance is the only sure way to escape a similar fate. In [my Deadest Rapper Alive] book, I sadly predicted that three major artists, Jay-Z, Lil Wayne, and Lil B, would lose their lives in 2012 because of this very reason. It was my sincere hope that these artists would turn away from this type of irreligious blasphemy and obtain God's mercy. But with the looks of Lil' Wayne's latest video 'Mirror' - in which he portrays Christ, Jay Z's Watch the Throne, and Minaj's performance, it does not appear as if that will be happening anytime soon." (SOHH)

Check out Nicki Minaj's interview below:

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