Styles P Juices Up Rap's Lost Art, "I Think It's Coming Back Around" [Video]

Tags For This Article: Kool G. Rap, Styles P, The LOX

Categories For This Article: East, New York, News

News: Styles P Juices Up Rap's Lost Art, "I Think It's Coming Back Around" [Video]

Monday, Sep 12, 2011 3:30PM

Written by Cyrus Langhorne

The LOX's Styles P recently gave his opinion on the rap game's lack of strong lyricism but admitted that clever wordplay within the genre is on the brink of return.

Declining from naming any artists whom he believed aren't skilled with their rhyme schemes, Styles feels hip-hop had lost its grasp on lyricism up until recently.

"Lyrics, I represent lyrics," Styles said in an interview. "I think that's a lost art but I think it's coming back around. I think -- I'm talking about the masses. It ain't all about me. I'm just talking lyricism as a whole." (Smash Block TV)

In March, rap veteran Kool G Rap shared his input on the lack of lyricism in 2011.

"It really don't bother me because not everybody is capable of being a G Rap, Big Daddy Kane, or KRS-One," Kool G said when asked about today's lack of wordplay. "That says a person is gifted. These are not any rappers you see on TV, rocking some jewelry, and see all the girls chasing them. Now you see kids like, 'Yo. I wanna do the same thing because I want all those things.' A Rakim, Big Daddy Kane, and G Rap kind of talent isn't just going to shoot up your body, and then instantly you become that talented artist. That's why it doesn't matter because some of these artists are just doing what they can do. They doing all that they can do. So then, that's when they make their swag stand out, and make swag a big thing. I mean swag was always a part of hip-hop, it's just we didn't call it swagger. We just used to say that someone was talented or had a lot of charisma. They just titled the sh*t 'swagger' now." (BallerStatus)

In late December, Waka Flocka Flame admitted lyricism was not his strongest ability.

"I don't feel like I'm no lyricist. I'm not in the booth trying to godd*mn rap big words," Flocka explained in an interview. "I'm not tryin' to show off my intelligence. Anybody could memorize big words, put 'em together. I could do that. But if I don't use the words on an everyday basis, why use the words in my rap? I just like music. I'm a lover of making music. It could be a big record, small record--as long as I'm making songs. One day it'll pop; that's how I look at it. Yeah. What I did in one year--one year--a lot of people accomplish in 10 years. A lot of people don't like that. They feel I don't deserve what I got. I'm a hard-a** worker. And I'm here for a reason. This sh*t ain't luck. I don't believe in luck." (RESPECT)

A few months ago, Wu-Tang Clan's Method Man discussed the changing image of what makes a true emcee.

"There are genuine artists out there who love what they do and do it with a purpose, but then you have those dudes who are a bunch of fashonistas," Meth explained in an interview. "These kids are more concerned with the way they look than what's coming out of their mouths...Back when I first came out if you told a kid 'I'm an MC,' the first thing the kid would say to you is, 'Oh yeah, well say a rhyme for me.' ...Nowadays, you tell the kid you're an MC and he's like 'Oh yeah, where's your big chain at? Where's your watch? Where's your car? That's what it is now.' ...The majority of the people who listen to the music can't afford half that sh*t." (Wall Street Journal)

Check out Styles P's interview below:

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