News: Al Sharpton Responds To Bill O'Reilly's MJ Rant, "His Personal Life Had Nothing To Do W/ Iconic Status" [Video]

Friday, Jul 10, 2009 1:00PM

Written by Cyrus Langhorne

The Reverend Al Sharpton has responded to Bill O'Reilly's recent rant against Michael Jackson's personal life and questioned the host's true intentions against the late singer.

Speaking on O'Reilly's show, Sharpton analyzed the controversial issues revolving around Jackson's child molestation allegations, children and explained the singer's achievements.

"First of all, you could have a large percentage of Americans who have had plastic surgery, maybe he had more resources, maybe a lot of this is exaggerated," Sharpton told O'Reilly. "The issue is it's totally irresponsible for a lawmaker to disregard the law. Charges were made against Jackson, a mostly non-black jury, 9 out of 12, let's try 12 out of 12 said he was not guilty of child molestation.It's reckless and irresponsible to say he was a child molester as it would be for me to come here and say [former Vice President] Dick Cheney shoots his friends hunting...What I said [at the memorial] was Michael Jackson, in his career, pop culture, broke down racial barriers. First black to get MTV to run black videos. First black to get Rolling Stone to put blacks on the cover.These are facts...For you and anyone else to bring up allegations about his personal life doesn't factor what he did. He brought people together...We didn't say he was an African American father of African American children, what he did in his personal life has nothing to do with his iconic status...I can see you and some undocumented people that are upset that he holds the record." (Fox News)

O'Reilly spoke on his personal opinions of Michael Jackson earlier this week.

"There's an old saying, 'You can't choose your family,' and it's true," O'Reilly said on his broadcast. "The family of Michael Jackson honored his memory today in Los Angeles and I do not, do not, wish to intrude on that...But Michael Jackson's place in America is a legitimate topic of discussion and 'Talking Points' is just about fed up with all the adulation. It is basically grand standing and pathetic in the extreme. Yes the man was an all-star entertainer but that's it. So enough with the phony platitudes, okay? The truth is Jackson's interactions with children were unacceptable for any adult. His incredible selfishness spending hundreds of millions of dollars on himself while singing 'We Are The World' should make any clear thinking American nauseous and why are Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton making this a racial deal? Jackson bleached his own skin and chose white men to provide existence for his in vitro children? I mean, give me a break with all this." ("Talking Points")

Drake recently shared his thoughts on the singer's skin color changes throughout his career.

"I don't think it matters about him changing himself," he said in an interview. "I don't think black people have resentment towards him for what he did to himself. Those were all personal decisions...I know there's things about me that I want to change...It's not to the point where I would do anything crazy, but then again, you can't speak for somebody else. I think you either appreciate him and what he did and what he gave us or you don't." (MTV)

Aside from numerous tribute-based performances, Jackson's memorial took place last Tuesday (July 7) from the Los Angeles Staples Center.

Michael Jackson's golden casket has been placed on stage at his public memorial service in downtown Los Angeles. The casket was brought into Staples Center on Tuesday (July 7) as a choir sang in front of a backdrop of stained-glass windows. The public event followed a private service for family and friends in a cemetery hall in the Hollywood Hills. Jackson's flower-draped casket was brought to Staples Center in a motorcade under law enforcement escort. (Ledger Enquirer)

Check out Al Sharpton's interview with Bill O'Reilly below:

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