News: Lil Wayne Forced To Hand Over "Tha Carter III" Profit Documents

Wednesday, Mar 18, 2009 4:29PM

Written by Cyrus Langhorne

A judge ordered Lil Wayne today (March 18) to turn over financial information on his latest album Tha Carter III to a folk singer who previously accused him of copyright infringement.

The decision was made early Wednesday afternoon for action to take place after the owner of the song Wayne sampled said he had no permission.

U.S. Magistrate Daniel Knowles III ordered the New Orleans rapper to hand over records about the sale of 2008's Tha Carter III. Karma-Ann Swanepoel claims in a federal lawsuit filed in May that Lil Wayne didn't have permission to sample her song "Once" in the track "I Feel Like Dying." The lawsuit says Lil Wayne's record label, Cash Money Records, failed to negotiate a license to use Swanepoel's song before millions of people downloaded "I Feel Like Dying." (Associated Press)

Concern grew on behalf of Swanepoel about the profits Weezy attained from indirect usage of the song.

"I Feel Like Dying" wasn't a track on "Tha Carter III," but a lawyer for Urband & Lazar Music Publishing said Lil Wayne promoted the album by singing that song in concert and allowing fans to download it for free on his Web site. "It's more akin to promotional material," attorney Melvin Albritton said. "He used the infringing work to promote himself." (Seattle Times)

However, Weezy's attorney Shantell Payton claims the record had little impact on the rapper's career.

Payton said the rapper doesn't control the Web site where fans downloaded "I Feel Like Dying." Payton also denied the song helped Lil Wayne promote his album. "Quite simply, 'I Feel Like Dying' did nothing for Mr. Carter's career," Lil Wayne's lawyers wrote in statements. (Court Documents)

The rapper recently settled a separate copyright lawsuit filed against him last summer regarding his record "Playing With Fire."

Lil Wayne's "Playing With Fire" was a clear derivative of the Rolling Stones song with the original lyrics and music altered in a recognizable way, Abkco said in its lawsuit. The disputed recording was voluntarily removed from the album and taken down by all providers of digital downloads, ringtones and ringbacks, according to a release issued today. The announcement states "all parties expressed themselves satisfied with the amicable settlement." (Billboard)

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