Exclusive: The Game Turns Over A New Leaf, Plans To Stay Clear Of Drama

Saturday, Aug 30, 2008 12:00PM

Published by SOHH.com

Written By Danica Dow

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Despite his recent digs at some rap rivals, The Game says he's trying to escape the drama. In this SOHH Exclusive the West Coast rapper reflects on past beefs, talks about channeling rap's late greats on his new album, LAX, and sends condolences to  one-time mentor Dr. Dre.

This week, The Game squashed his beef with New Jersey rapper Joe Budden by bringing him out at a show in New York City and acknowledging that he got into many unnecessary beefs during his time with G-Unit.

The Game said he's learned from that experience and wouldn't take back anything that he's said or done in the past. This revelation comes shortly after he called out Jay-Z and threatened to "turn that Roc-A-Fella sign into a pee stain."   But Game insists that what's in the past--distant and recent--is water under the bridge. "I don't regret anything.  You make mistakes.  I just acknowledge them.  The beefs that I had back in the day were beefs that I had.  I understand them, I know them and I did what I did.  No apologies, no regrets."

"For the future [I'll] just try to be a little bit more wiser.  I was young and wild then," he explained.

"I know that person and can go back to that person if need be but I'm focused right now.  I'm on another level [with] my lyrical growth and my mind is free," he said. "I got spaces in my head for other things outside of drama and bullshit."

One song on LAX where Game got to demonstrate his newfound lyrical growth is "Never Can Say Goodbye." There, he raps from the perspective of 2Pac, The Notorious B.I.G. and Easy E just before their respective deaths.

"I came up with it one night in the studio and I didn't know if I could pull it off," he said. "I knew I had ‘Pac and the story of Easy that was sorta me being that I grew up and I come from the N.W.A cloth.  The Biggie was tough to pull off but as I rolled through the middle of the verse it started to become fun and easy. It made for a dope song, a dope concept."

Though his former mentor, Dr. Dre, didn't produce any tracks on L.A.X., the Game insists that they're still in contact.  "Its not like I don't talk to Dre.  I talk to Dre every now and then," he said.

The Game also took the time to send his condolences to the producer for the recent death of his 20-year-old son, Andre Young Jr.

"I met him once or twice but we wasn't tight like that," he said.  "All I can do is pray and send my condolences and that's it. I don't know what to really say when people pass away except to keep the family in my prayers and send condolences."

L.A.X. is in stores now.

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